Colorado

Sherri Renner standing on the summit of Mt Quandary near Breckenridge, CO, in June 2012

Here’s a Fun Fact

Mention Colorado, and most people are likely to imagine soaring mountains, world-class skiing, and rugged wilderness. They probably wouldn’t think about the Declaration of Independence, even though the 100th anniversary of its signing provides Colorado with its nickname: The Centennial State. According to StateSymbolsUSA.org:

Colorado is nicknamed ‘The Centennial State’ because it became the 38th state of the United States in 1876 (one hundred years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence).

Been a while since you’ve read the Declaration? Visit Archives.gov and adopt a new reason to adore Colorado.

Law Links

Law Libraries

Colorado’s individual county governments are responsible for providing courtrooms and other court facilities. It’s easy to imagine the challenges rural counties have in raising sufficient revenue to build and maintain adequate court facilities. It’s understandable, then, that many Colorado counties consider public law libraries to be luxuries that are beyond the county taxpayers’ collective reach.

Stacks of books forming a wall in which there is a green door

And for good reason: Law libraries are expensive to establish and expensive to maintain. As an example, a new set of Colorado Revised Statutes Annotated – a staple in any Colorado law library collection – comes with a pricetag of $9,034 (as of Dec. 5, 2017). Purchasing periodic updates (usually published twice a year) and employing law librarians are necessary so that patrons using this and other resources, and relying on their accuracy, have access to the current law.

Even though public law libraries are few and far between in Colorado, the online resources go a long way toward filling the access gaps. Visit the library websites (links are in the map below) for more information.

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on LinkedIn

Comments are closed.